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Making the shift to LED lighting

General ·
How-To ·

I have had many discussions during recent projects about making the move from traditional halogen to LED lighting.  While clients are keen to move to a more energy efficient form of lighting, the higher initial cost and their concerns over the colour and brightness of the light output from an LED light often causes them to hesitate.  

The myth is that a switch to LED lights will mean that your warm, cosy space becomes a cold and light glaring hospital waiting room.  That may have been true of early LEDs but changes over the last few years have brought a wide range of colour and brightness in LED lighting.  Halogen lighting is a warm 2700K temperature now available in many LED lighting fixtures.  However, my preference is for the slightly cooler 3000K temperature.  

Warm, yellow light has a big impact on the finishes in a room - grey walls can look purple, countertops dull, and it can mess with the tones in your hardwood floors.  It is not a huge jump to 3000K from a 2700K halogen - but it is just a little crisper and cooler, enough to make a difference - and it is still a long ways off the very cool, blue tones at the 40000-5000K end of the spectrum.  

Having recently switched all the halogen pot lights in my home to 3000K LEDs, I can tell you that my home still feels warm and inviting, but my Benjamin Moore Whisper grey walls are crisper; the colours of my cushions are sharper and the textures of my hardwood and rugs more defined; I won’t be needing change any light bulbs again - and my Hydro bill noticeably dropped!

A few things to think about if considering LED lighting: dimmers are important - I like to install many throughout a home - but your existing dimmer switches may not work on LED lighting and in that case you will need to upgrade to a LED dimmer for some or all; consider angled pot lights for accent walls, fireplaces and art - lighting can really help to highlight the features in a room; and always work with a lighting specialist and consult with an electrician before buying. 

I work closely with my electricians and lighting specialists to come up with the best options for each project and we have had some great results.  

For more ideas, check out Luminosa Light Design.  They are a wealth of knowledge about lighting options and applications.  Their showroom is in Vancouver and they have a great instagram page showcasing new and exciting products (@luminosalight)


General ·
How-To ·

Making the shift to LED lighting

I have had many discussions during recent projects about making the move from traditional halogen to LED lighting.  While clients are keen to move to a more energy efficient form of lighting, the higher initial cost and their concerns over the colour and brightness of the light output from an LED light often causes them to hesitate.  

The myth is that a switch to LED lights will mean that your warm, cosy space becomes a cold and light glaring hospital waiting room.  That may have been true of early LEDs but changes over the last few years have brought a wide range of colour and brightness in LED lighting.  Halogen lighting is a warm 2700K temperature now available in many LED lighting fixtures.  However, my preference is for the slightly cooler 3000K temperature.  

Warm, yellow light has a big impact on the finishes in a room - grey walls can look purple, countertops dull, and it can mess with the tones in your hardwood floors.  It is not a huge jump to 3000K from a 2700K halogen - but it is just a little crisper and cooler, enough to make a difference - and it is still a long ways off the very cool, blue tones at the 40000-5000K end of the spectrum.  

Having recently switched all the halogen pot lights in my home to 3000K LEDs, I can tell you that my home still feels warm and inviting, but my Benjamin Moore Whisper grey walls are crisper; the colours of my cushions are sharper and the textures of my hardwood and rugs more defined; I won’t be needing change any light bulbs again - and my Hydro bill noticeably dropped!

A few things to think about if considering LED lighting: dimmers are important - I like to install many throughout a home - but your existing dimmer switches may not work on LED lighting and in that case you will need to upgrade to a LED dimmer for some or all; consider angled pot lights for accent walls, fireplaces and art - lighting can really help to highlight the features in a room; and always work with a lighting specialist and consult with an electrician before buying. 

I work closely with my electricians and lighting specialists to come up with the best options for each project and we have had some great results.  

For more ideas, check out Luminosa Light Design.  They are a wealth of knowledge about lighting options and applications.  Their showroom is in Vancouver and they have a great instagram page showcasing new and exciting products (@luminosalight)


General ·
How-To ·

Making the shift to LED lighting

July 16, 2020

I have had many discussions during recent projects about making the move from traditional halogen to LED lighting.  While clients are keen to move to a more energy efficient form of lighting, the higher initial cost and their concerns over the colour and brightness of the light output from an LED light often causes them to hesitate.  

The myth is that a switch to LED lights will mean that your warm, cosy space becomes a cold and light glaring hospital waiting room.  That may have been true of early LEDs but changes over the last few years have brought a wide range of colour and brightness in LED lighting.  Halogen lighting is a warm 2700K temperature now available in many LED lighting fixtures.  However, my preference is for the slightly cooler 3000K temperature.  

Warm, yellow light has a big impact on the finishes in a room - grey walls can look purple, countertops dull, and it can mess with the tones in your hardwood floors.  It is not a huge jump to 3000K from a 2700K halogen - but it is just a little crisper and cooler, enough to make a difference - and it is still a long ways off the very cool, blue tones at the 40000-5000K end of the spectrum.  

Having recently switched all the halogen pot lights in my home to 3000K LEDs, I can tell you that my home still feels warm and inviting, but my Benjamin Moore Whisper grey walls are crisper; the colours of my cushions are sharper and the textures of my hardwood and rugs more defined; I won’t be needing change any light bulbs again - and my Hydro bill noticeably dropped!

A few things to think about if considering LED lighting: dimmers are important - I like to install many throughout a home - but your existing dimmer switches may not work on LED lighting and in that case you will need to upgrade to a LED dimmer for some or all; consider angled pot lights for accent walls, fireplaces and art - lighting can really help to highlight the features in a room; and always work with a lighting specialist and consult with an electrician before buying. 

I work closely with my electricians and lighting specialists to come up with the best options for each project and we have had some great results.  

For more ideas, check out Luminosa Light Design.  They are a wealth of knowledge about lighting options and applications.  Their showroom is in Vancouver and they have a great instagram page showcasing new and exciting products (@luminosalight)


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